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Landlords! Gross

dogcopter posted 4/20/2021 16:52 PM

I can't shake an experience I had the other day and I want to vent ask you guys your opinion.

If you aren't familiar with my story, I am leaving my wife as soon as my lawyer tells me it's ok. So I'm looking for a place to stay. I don't like the idea of renting, I'm used to owning, but that is probably what I will have to do.

I went to see a landlord. He asked to meet my German Shepherd. I told him over the phone he takes a minute to warm up to new people and he usually barks at them.

I got out of the car and he barked at the guy, went up and sniffed him and continued to bark for a little bit more.

The guy was like "this isn't going to work, sorry, he's not very well socialized".

He did exactly what I told him the dog would do over the phone!

It is so hard going back to renting after owning my house for 15 years. Especially when power trippy landlords make you jump through hoops to get the apartments.

Am I wrong? What really is the risk to him?

barcher144 posted 4/20/2021 17:39 PM

I was in the same position as you once upon a time.

My landlord (first apartment post-separation) was not excited about me having a dog in his place because the previous tenants had a dog that did damage to the place. But, he let me keep the dog...

I've also worked as a handyman for a rental management company. I definitely see why certain owners don't want their tenants to have dogs.

phmh posted 4/20/2021 18:28 PM

When my next door neighbors moved in, the man came over and told me that they had one dog that would bark occasionally.

Their definition of occasionally and mine is different because that dog barks at least 7 hours per day (meaning less than 10 minutes in between barking fits for over 7 hours every day), as well as intermittently at night.

When I got divorced, I also was renting for the first time since college, and it was hard to find a rental place with pets. Just gave me motivation to buy my own place ASAP.

I can totally see why landlords won't rent to people with pets, though. Many people live in an alternate reality when they describe the behavior of their pets. I see it all the time. (And I'm a huge animal lover.) Why take the risk of property destruction, smells, noise, potential liability for bites, etc., when you can find someone without a pet that won't have those risks?

dogcopter posted 4/20/2021 18:51 PM

I get it. But divorce happens all the time and pets are purchased when the marriage is healthy (or when it's not in an effort to fix it) There must be a huge amount of possible tenants who need places to stay post marriage with their animals. And it's a legitimate problem. I don't want to leave my best friend :(

Also, it really upsets me that I told him over the phone what the dog would do, he did it, and somehow failed the test. The only way he could have passed was to exceed the expectations I had setup...

dogcopter posted 4/20/2021 20:19 PM

it's really just a vent I guess...

dogcopter posted 4/21/2021 11:08 AM

I'm chagrined at the title. I was very angry when I created it, but I do understand why people would be careful about such things. Landlords aren't "gross" or awful for wanting caution. I was just mad.

My apologies to landlords who read this and were offended.

I think if I could, I would like to change the title to "It's hard going back to renting after owning" or simply "Moving out is hard."

Bigger posted 4/21/2021 11:15 AM

Next time a landlord asks to meet the dog then maybe you could get better results by doing the following:
Make sure your dog knows both sit/wait and lie/wait. Train this with him until you can tell him to lie still while you walk 10-20 yards away (or the extended long-leash).
Give your dog more time to adapt to the new environment. Be there ahead of the landlord, or if the landlord is at the site then park half a block away and walk the rest. Gives the dog time to calm down after the ride and adjust to the environment.
Once on-site have the dog lie down with the command to wait. Meet the landlord and call the dog (sneaking the dog a treat).

Practice this with your dog BEFORE meeting a landlord.

grubs posted 4/21/2021 11:50 AM

Next time a landlord asks to meet the dog then maybe you could get better results by doing the following:
Make sure your dog knows both sit/wait and lie/wait. Train this with him until you can tell him to lie still while you walk 10-20 yards away (or the extended long-leash).
Give your dog more time to adapt to the new environment. Be there ahead of the landlord, or if the landlord is at the site then park half a block away and walk the rest. Gives the dog time to calm down after the ride and adjust to the environment.
Once on-site have the dog lie down with the command to wait. Meet the landlord and call the dog (sneaking the dog a treat).
Practice this with your dog BEFORE meeting a landlord

This. You're already fishing in a very small pond due to having a larger dog. You want to get the best impression that you can. There's less than 300 available apartments city wide (~10% of total) that allow any dogs. Most of those have size restrictions.

dogcopter posted 4/21/2021 12:35 PM

You're already fishing in a very small pond due to having a larger dog

I guess this is part of the root of my frustration. The landlord/tenant business relationship is the most invasive kind of business relationship there is. I'm freaking out that I may have leave my dog until I can buy. And I'm a little bitter about it. Doesn't seem like any man ought to be able to tell another man to give up his dog so that he can have a place to live.

He does know these commands; I just didn't think about it. Really, if I had put some really high value treats (salami) in my pocket he might not have barked at all trying to earn them.

BIGGER, I should have gotten there earlier; that is a good idea...

MickeyBill2016 posted 4/21/2021 14:06 PM

On one hand you learned a good lesson in this encounter with the the landlord, to get there 20 minutes early and walk around with your dog.
Most landlords don't want dogs in their buildings. for every dog owner, there are 10 non dog owners looking for a place. One less thing for the LL to deal with.

OTOH dogs are good judges of character...

dogcopter posted 4/21/2021 14:18 PM

OTOH dogs are good judges of character...

This is true. I took him to another showing the same day and he didn't bark very much. Made up with that person pretty quickly.

Bigger posted 4/21/2021 18:45 PM

One idea? Something that might place you top of the list…
If your dog already knows most commands this will be easy. Train him to lie and wait. Hand a treat to someone else (not you) and he can stand up and retrieve the treat on your command. Next time you meet a landlord have the dog lie and Fido will be waiting all quiet and friendly for the new hooman to offer him a treat – at your command. Doesn’t matter if you do it though once the command is given.

Anna123 posted 4/21/2021 21:41 PM

It is so hard going back to renting after owning my house for 15 years.

Ughh been there after owning for years before becoming an owner again, BUT, renting at the time turned out to be a blessing. The feeling of renting after owning is unsettling, but you will adjust and it has it's perks.

It is obviously not that he was worried about a dogs in general since he was willing to consider. It was probably the size, not tail-wagging unfriendliness and barking. I can see potential landlords being concerned about that in todays litigious society. (This is a pet peeve of mine btw, the potential for far-reaching lawsuits destroy otherwise normal human interaction, for example, your landlord being comfortable renting to you).

Hopefully you will find someone who knows dogs and can read he is not a danger.

dogcopter posted 4/22/2021 07:18 AM

It was probably the size

Anna123
Good point. He is big and I didn't tell him that over the phone. And I know that his bark was more the "alert, new person" bark and not the "Back off now!" bark. But the landlord didn't know that and maybe he wasn't prepared for it.

Bigger
This is a great suggestion. I'm going to take some cheese on our walk today and if I bump to any strangers willing to try that, we can.

EvenKeel posted 4/22/2021 08:08 AM

Ugh - I am sorry dcopter!

It is so hard to find places that accept large dogs. My DS just relocated and had a really hard time with this as well. He has a mastiff. She is still a puppy but already over 100 pds.

Like you, he was heartbroken that he might have to leave her with me until he could afford to buy a place.

He finally found a complex outside of town that took large dogs...whew.

But keep looking and networking (maybe talk to folks at your dog parks, etc) to see if they may know of places that allow large dogs.

Fingers crossed for ya!

DragnHeart posted 4/22/2021 08:19 AM

I rehomed our great dane and pug when we had to move from the inlaws. Broke my heart. Eventually found a farm house to rent. Landlord said we could have brought the dogs...

Never give up hope you'll find a place.

Shehawk posted 4/22/2021 08:23 AM

Really sorry dc. I think that the loss of basic control over our lives is a super hard part of this whole what I now call the dumpster fire my husband started in our lives and walked away from.

If you are close to madison WI we are looking for a third roommate lol and we like german Shepards.

Seriously though, I don't know where you are but I wonder if some sort of nontraditional arrangement other than rental of an apartment might be workable.

As an example an older friend of mine rents a room in her basement and it is on a large tract of land. I have a housemate now who pays crippling alimony but he has a car (with crippling debt but it's better than my situation where I don't have a car) all after long term spouse walked out of his marriage. Together tho we keep the lights on and the grass mowed and can drive to get basic things.

I would have let him bring his big dog even if it was a German Shepherd, but the ex got the dog too.

Sometimes honestly our new reality is raw. And we have to deal with things we didn't expect or deserve

Chaos posted 4/22/2021 08:34 AM

I'm sorry. I love German Sheppard's. They are the sweetest dogs.

But they have also been on the bad end of some press recently.

And - sadly there are so many lawsuits resulting in big dogs with historic "aggressive personalities" that would tend to make a landlord shy of them so to speak.

While inconvenient now, it probably saved you from a bunch of landlord disputes further down the road. If landlord reacted this way now, it was only foreshadowing of what may have been to come and saved you from being in a lease with a PITA landlord.

WowItsReallyReal posted 4/24/2021 11:27 AM

Don't give up hope! Go into overdrive trying to find a place!
I contacted EVERY price range rental in the area we were moving to (any that did not specifically say NO pets) when I was trying to find places during/after my D.
I had a Great Dane and 2 Dobermans (one Dobe has since passed away), so trust that I " get it".
We found a house with a LOT of effort, in both states. Just keep trying!
Work on training, work on meeting strangers, make a positive "doggie bio", too. I told of my dogs Obedience training/titles
(get an AKC CGC at minimum)! Our hobbies together (like swimming & hiking). I mentioned their crate training & how they're never loose in the house when I'm not home, etc. How I don't allow them to bark, or run loose. How they're fully vaccinated, microchiped, & spayed (with proof). Add a cutsie photo.

For awhile I seriously thought I was going to wind up living in a tent with them (giving them up, for me, was not an option).... but we eventually found ONE landlord in each state in the area/price range we needed. Looking took on average 2 months if DAILY emails out to potential landlords. Be prepared to pay additional security deposits.

GOOD LUCK!! It's going to be frustrating, but so worth it if you are able to keep your bud.

Jeaniegirl posted 4/24/2021 13:30 PM

I cannot imagine having to rent with all the animals I have. Six outside barn kitties that keep the snakes away - and two tiny (rescue) dogs that bark at leaves blowing. I love big dogs but don't have any right now. German Shepherds and big ole' Golden Retrievers or Golden Labs are my favorite. Maybe teach your GS a new trick of taking a 'gift' to prospective landlords. A tennis ball or chew toy. Good luck!

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